Tag Archives: Sister Annie

Sister Annie may have been a deaconess associated with one or more churches in Sunderland, including the South Durham Street United Methodist Free Church, where ALL was a member. See also Chapel.

19 December 1917; Wednesday

Paraded at 9 o’clock and spent the day helping him1 and chopping wood. Had good fire at night with plenty smoke. Tried to write to Sister Annie2. Had toast to tea and supper.


  1. “Him”: Probably Chapman again; see yesterday’s entry. ALL occasionally wrote up two or more days at the same time and probably did so for 18/19 December 1917. Having written “Chapman” on the 18th, ALL continued to write the entry for the 19th and wrote “him” referring to Chapman, the last name he had mentioned. 

  2. Sister Annie: See note on 28 December 1916

29 October 1917; Monday

Up about 9 o’clock. Went up to see Mr Eaves1. Wrote to Harvey’s brother and wrote up diary.

[Diary reverts to pencil at this point – obviously written up after ALL’s return to France.]

Sister Annie2 called at night and we had a long argument on men – whether they are as good as parsons think they are or not. She stayed until 7 o’clock. I had supper and then we all went up to the station. I left by the 9.15. †Annie Freeman† at the station to see Teddie Tudor† off but he wasn’t going. †Dee Frere† and Hilda3 there. Called at Granny in the afternoon just after tea. Jack at the station too and Joe.

Left Sunderland 9.15 for Newcastle. Arrived Newcastle about 10 and left again after an hour4. Got5 seat in the train.


  1. Edward Eaves was a minister at the South Durham Street United Methodist Free Church. According to the diary, ALL had written to Mr Eaves twice, on 28 December 1916 and 28 May 1917, the latter shortly after Mr Mullens, another minister at the church, had died, presumably to offer condolences. Mr Eaves had officiated at Mr Mullens’ funeral. 

  2. “Sister Annie” is also named as a mourner at the funeral of Mr Mullens on 23 May 1917. See also note on 28 December 1916

  3. It is unclear which Hilda this may have been. 

  4. The map shows the first part of ALL’s journey back to France, from Sunderland (A) to London (C) on an overnight train, via Newcastle (B). 

  5. There is an indeterminate mark in the shorthand between “Got” and “seat”; it could be “no”, but this seems inconsistent with “fairly good journey”, in the 30 October entry. 

Sunderland Daily Echo 23 May 1917

FUNERAL OF MR J. MULLENS.

Image © Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

Image and text via the British Newspaper Archive.

The funeral of the late Mr James Mullens, commercial traveller, who died while travelling by train on Sunday to fulfil a preaching engagement, took place at noon to-day. The coffin was of polished fumed oak with brass mountings, the shield bearing the inscription : “James Mullens, died May 20, 1917, aged 73 years.” The officiating minister was the Rev. Edward Eaves, and the interment was made in the family burial ground in Sunderland Cemetery, Ryhope Road. The mourners included Mrs F. W. Waggott (sister), Mr G. P. Mullens, Mr H. R. Mullens (sons), Mr and Mrs Arthur Mullins (son and daughter-in-law), Mr F. Waggott (son-in-law), Mr E. Stokes (brother-in-law), Mr J. H. Waggott, Sister Annie, Mr. E. Potts, Miss Hammond, Mr J. W. Gant, Mr R. P. Hann, Mr R. Bailes, Mr Eaves, and Mr J. Hine. There were no flowers, by request. Messrs Crofton and Sons had charge of the funeral arrangements.

28 December 1916; Thursday

Up as usual. My first free day off. Spent it at the Y M writing letters to Mr Eaves, Sister Annie1 and home. Heard a speech and a bit of a debate in the Y M last thing.


  1. Sister Annie may have been a deaconess associated with one or more churches in Sunderland, including the South Durham Street United Methodist Free Church, where ALL was a member. Her name continues to appear in the diaries occasionally.