Tag Archives: Library

Diary entries which mention books and other publications read by Arthur Linfoot. See also Arthur Linfoot’s Library.

23 August 1917; Thursday

Up about 7 o’clock. No parade in the morning on account of rain. Short route march in the afternoon and at the Follies at night. Did bit French and got some copies of Great Thoughts1 from the new chap and gave him Everyman2.


  1. “Great Thoughts”: Possibly a magazine or periodical, although we have been unable to locate a copy. 

  2. “Everyman”: Also a magazine or periodical. See Everyman, all posts tagged “Everyman” and Arthur Linfoot’s Library

21 August 1917; Tuesday

Up at 7.15. Most of the chaps *. I got a pair of new boots. Fine morning. No parade in the afternoon and I did a bit French. Had short walk at night with Harry Bascombe and Vic Barber. Read a bit from Everyman1 and read an account of an Italian and a French victory. Italians 7600 prisoners at *2. French 4000 prisoners.


  1. “Everyman”: See Everyman, all posts tagged “Everyman” and Arthur Linfoot’s Library

  2. Name (shorthand outline S-v-d- ?) not identified, but in the 6th Battle of the Isonzo (August 1917), the best episode of the War for Italy, Gen. Cadorna captured Gorizia on the 8th, made a bridgehead over the Isonzo (now Soča), and ended this offensive on 17th August. 

12 July 1917; Thursday

Up at 7 o’clock. The German big gun sent over some shells and killed 10 people and wounded a lot. Walked to Méteren at night with Driver. Went part of the way with Piggy Wood and Vic Draper†. Called at the old hospital and in the Y M. Bought a †Peter Nanning†1 and read good part of it. Lieutenant Jones went out.


  1. Probably a book of some kind although the transcription of the author’s name is uncertain. 

25 June 1917; Monday

Up at 7 o’clock. Rather late with our work first thing. Out in the afternoon. Lieutenant Gunning and Captain Russell went to C C S. Wrote letter to Ernie. Not much doing at night. Read little satire ‘Pig on Artemis.”1 Freddy Holmes drunk and Dai Davies drunk last thing.

[2 – 3 lines scarcely visible: “…. orderlies ….off a waggon ….. and we had him in …. time. He appeared a bit shaken.”]

German aeroplanes dropped 8 bombs near the aerodrome at about midnight and put the wind up us. The big gun also shelled the rail head.


  1. “Pig on Artemis” may have been an item in a magazine such as Everyman. See also Everyman and Arthur Linfoot’s Library

24 June 1917; Sunday

Up at 6.45. Kept busy all day. Finished about 4 o’clock and went to Y M with Lomax and Gus. Very good service and I stayed afterwards to the sing-song. Grand service and returned to billet. Lay awake until nearly midnight reading. Finished by “At the Foot of the Rainbow”1 and finished it. The big German gun threw over 4 shells and then an aeroplane or two dropped 8 bombs. We got the wind up and went down craters for a few minutes. Returned again and slept well all day.

David * went down the line.

A new captain came to take over from Captain Johnson.


  1. At the Foot of the Rainbow is a 1907 novel by Gene Stratton-Porter, an early naturalist, nature photographer, and one of the first women to form a movie studio and production company, Gene Stratton-Porter Productions, Inc. See also At the Foot of the Rainbow and Arthur Linfoot’s Library

30 May 1917; Wednesday

Up at 6.30. Very busy first thing. Did a bit French in the afternoon. Read a bit of Stacpoole’s novel1. Received another officer – R G A2. Fine onset†. Out at night with Dai Davies and Driver. We went to the concert hall where there was a lecture on Egypt by Bishop Gawain†. It was pretty interesting and the Army Group Commander was in the chair. An orchestra was in attendance and we sang two hymns. Sergeant Holmes went with us and when he saw the hymn books <he> came out again, and afterwards said it was a swindle advertising a lecture and then having hymns. Met an old Sheffield chap in a shop at night.

Shelled by big high velocity gun during the night and put the wind up many of us.


  1. “Stacpoole’s novel”: See footnote on 29 May, Stacpoole and Arthur Linfoot’s Library

  2. R G A: Royal Garrison Artillery, the branch in which Ernie Linfoot was serving. 

29 May 1917; Tuesday

Up at 6.45. Not quite so warm. Usual work. Had short walk in the town in the afternoon. On at night. A new officer in with impetigo1. Did a little French and read a bit of Stacpoole’s2  Wilderness†3. Sergeant Powell and Steve Bott called and told of the shelling up the line. They had 60 cases through the dressing station last night. In at night and managed all right. Received another officer in my ward – a captain in the R Amb4. Busy until nearly 11 o’clock.


  1. Impetigo: contagious skin disease, formerly quite common. 

  2. Stacpoole: If correct, could be either: Henry De Vere Stacpoole (1863 – 1951); a very popular and prolific Irish author; best-known for his novel “The Blue Lagoon” (adapted as films many times, most famously in 1980), or; HDVS’ eldest brother, William Henry Stacpoole (1846 – 1914); doctor of divinity, Dean of Kingstown school and also a published author. 

  3. “Wilderness”: The shorthand reading is probably not correct; no work with this or any similar title appears in any list of works by either Stacpoole. See also Arthur Linfoot’s Library

  4. R Amb: presumably Royal Ambulance Service, or Corps – but not traced under these names. 

Stacpoole

The Blue LagoonOn 29 May 1917, Arthur Linfoot wrote that he had “read a bit of Stacpoole’s Wilderness”. He continued reading it on 30 May.

Stacpoole could be either Henry De Vere Stacpoole (1863 – 1951), a very popular and prolific Irish author best-known for his novel The Blue Lagoon (1908; adapted as films many times, most famously in 1980), or; HDVS’ eldest brother, William Henry Stacpoole (1846 – 1914), doctor of divinity, Dean of Kingstown1 school and also a published author.

No book entitled “Wilderness” appears in bibliographies of either Stacpoole although much of HDVS’ oeuvre (including The Blue Lagoon) takes wilderness as a theme, while WHS’ books are all science fiction. This may suggest that the book Arthur Linfoot was reading on this day was by Henry De Vere Stacpoole, although which of his books this was remains unclear.


  1. The Irish coastal town of Dún Laoghaire was known as Kingstown from 1821 to 1920.