Tag Archives: Ernie

Ernie was Arthur Linfoot’s elder brother. See also the Family page.

15 November 1918; Friday

Up about 7.30. Moved off about 10 o’clock and arrived at Haussy1 about 2.30. Had a good billet. Received letters from home, Ernie and Charlie. 5 men going on leave tomorrow. Had good night’s sleep.


  1. Haussy (B): 10km SW. of Sepmeries (A) and 3km SE. of Montrécourt; see 2 November. 

14 November 1918; Thursday

Up at about 7.30. Ordered to pack up and march off about 11 o’clock. Marched after dinner until nearly 5 o’clock, when we arrived at Sepmeries1. Received letter from Ernie. Pretty heavy march and we were tired when we arrived. Got down to bed early and slept well.


  1. Sepmeries (B): 15km WSW. of Bettrechies (A) and 9km SSE. of Valenciennes; Michelin square N6. 

16 August 1918; Friday

Up at 7 o’clock. Informed that the C O is not satisfied with the progress made with the work and that we must do an hour extra in the afternoon, and be C B1 at night. At night finished at 4.30 and told that the progress of the work done is satisfactory and that we may go out at night. Worked at our own dugout and dug the back out but it fell in. Night wasted. Received letter from home. Wrote letter to Ernie.


  1. C B: Confined to Barracks. 

1 August 1918; Thursday

Up at 2.30 and wrote letter to Ernie until 5 o’clock. On pay parade at mid-day. Did a bit French in the afternoon. Went to the interpreters’ first French class and thought it will be very interesting. On duty at 6 o’clock. Not much to do. Turned in about 11 o’clock but couldn’t sleep for aeroplanes.

27 July 1918; Saturday

Up at 7 o’clock. Rain most of the day. Wrote letter home and one to Ernie. Received letter from Harvey. Did a little French and washed some clothes. Heard of the Coventry strike1.


  1. There was an engineering and munitions strike in Birmingham and Coventry in July 1918, caused by ‘the embargo’: a Government prohibition of the employment of additional skilled men in specified firms; it applied to very few firms, and was not generally known until a misleading notice by one of the affected firms drew attention to it. The strikes ended after a week, when the Government announced that those still on strike on 29 July would have their protection certificates withdrawn, making them eligible for conscription.