Tag Archives: Ernie

Ernie was Arthur Linfoot’s elder brother. See also the Family page.

13 October 1917; Saturday

Up about 7.30. Decided to go to meet Ernie but he came to see me with a friend. Harvey joined us and we walked into Locre and back by La Clytte1. He told me that he had been recommended for a Military Medal2. Had good time together. Had tea in Locre.


  1. The map shows this journey, from Kemmel (A) to Locre (B) and back via La Clytte (C). 

  2. Although not recorded in the diary, Ernie had been awarded the Military Medal on 4th October for repairing communication wiring at night in No Man’s Land. This was a routine occupation, but the staff officer who saw Ernie doing it recommended him for the award because he assumed it must be an exceptional act of bravery – an assumption about which Ernie remained indignant for the rest of his life. See further narrative about Ernie and the R.G.A. in the footnote on 12 May 1916, all posts tagged “Ernie” and the Family page. 

24 September 1917; Monday

Up about 7 o’clock. On fatigue for a short while and then told off to go with the American doctor to see the Divisional column sick. Ernie called for me at noon and I got the afternoon off. Went into Locre. Called at the Y M and had tea and a tune; had tea in a house and then walked in to Mont Rouge. Called in at the Follies and started back shortly after 7 o’clock. Left Ernie about 8.30 near to La Laiterie1. The longest stay yet that we have had together. Enjoyed the day immensely. On return found that Driver had come down with shell shock, and that Holman had taken his place. They had wanted me but I was out. Nick Stake† sleeping above me and drunk. He fell out of bed and spent the night on a stretcher on the floor.


  1. La Laiterie: A military cemetery begun in November 1914 and named after an old dairy farm which, perhaps, had previously occupied the site. La Laiterie (B) is located about 1km NE of Kemmel (A) on the N331 road to Ieper/Ypres. 

7 September 1917; Friday

Up shortly after 7 o’clock. Parades as usual. Got inspected at 2 o’clock. Digging trench round a tent all morning. Went to Reninghelst at night and saw Ernie. We walked into the village and went to the Snipers1. They were very poor. Left shortly before 8 o’clock and returned about 9. Met a sergeant on the way who spoke of a very big attack * on the coast.


  1. The Snipers: Another revue? 

2 September 1917; Sunday

Up at 7 o’clock. Finished at noon and set out to Ernie at the battery1 and arrived about 3.45. Found that Ernie had gone down sick. Swan and the red-haired lad set me down to Dikbush A D S2. I was informed that Ernie had gone to Reninghelst3. Walked down to Reninghelst and arrived there about 7 o’clock. Stayed about half an hour with Ernie and then returned to headquarters.

Bombs dropped all round in the night.


  1. Ernie was stationed at Dikkebus near Ypres in Belgium; see note on 5 July 

  2. Dikbush A D S: Dikkebus (B) Advanced Dressing Station;. 

  3. Reninghelst, now Reninghelst (Flemish), about 6km E of Boeschepe (A). 

19 July 1917; Thursday

Up at 7 o’clock. Cleaned dixie in the morning. Had jacket mended at Madame’s. Ernie down in the afternoon and I walked up to Kemmel†1 with him after seeing the town and having tea at a little place in town. Both had a lot to say. On duty at night. An officer of Freddie’s taken rather worse and needed attention.

Ernie paid me a visit.


  1. Kemmel (A) (if correct transcription), a small town in Belgium just over midway between Bailleul (B), where ALL was stationed, and Dikkebus (C), where Ernie was stationed. 

15 July 1917; Sunday

Up at 7 o’clock. Off in the afternoon and night and went to La Clytte to see Ernie, but he didn’t turn up. Gus Rodman and Bob Walker with me. Stayed to the service at the La Clytte Y M. Service not up to much. An R F C motor-cycle came to grief on the way down and we helped him. Not much worse. Beautiful night. Turned in in good time. Received field card from Ernie to say he couldn’t get.