Tag Archives: Ernie

Ernie was Arthur Linfoot’s elder brother. See also the Family page.

10 December 1917; Monday

Up about 8 o’clock. No rations up so we had iron ration biscuits and bully for breakfast with a drink of tea with no sugar. Paraded at 10. I reported sick and was given duty. The American officer put a bandage on my ankle. Spent afternoon writing a letter home. We tried to improve our billet but the sergeants took it from us because two officers took theirs. Received letters from Gertie, Mother, Ernie and Hilda Linfoot1 in New Zealand. Got down to it about 8 o’clock. Got a look inside of a tank. Walked round inside of it and was very much interested in it. Quite a lot2 where we are. A rumour that some of us are going to a place on duty.


  1. Hilda Tate Linfoot, ALL’s cousin. See Hilda disambiguation page

  2. “Quite a lot [of tanks]”: By this stage of the war in late 1917, tanks were deployed in large numbers – see also note on 22 November

8 November 1917; Thursday

Up about 7 o’clock. On parade at 9 o’clock. Helped to pack in the morning. Got pass to Bailleul in the afternoon but Ernie didn’t turn up there so I only went into Locre. Returned in good time.

Heard of the death of Willie Whittaker 1 in a letter from Ernie.


  1. ALL also recorded this in a note added to his diary on the date of Willie Whittaker’s death, 22 October 1917

4 November 1917; Sunday

Military Medal
Ernie Linfoot’s military medal. Image courtesy of Patricia Munn. Click or tap to enlarge.

Up at 7 o’clock. Went up on the car to spoil bank on working party and stayed until about 3 o’clock. Rode down on two lorries. Ernie waiting for me. Harry Bascombe looked after him and got him tea. Ernie stayed to the beginning of the Y M service. He was wearing the Military Medal. I set him up the way back to the brasserie, and we talked all about my leave and all the rest of it.

Saw Ernie first thing after leave and he was wearing the Military Medal.

3 November 1917; Saturday

Up about 7 o’clock. On fatigue all day [“morning” written above, but “day” not erased]. Got pass to go and see Ernie in the afternoon. Walked to Dikbush and when I found the place he wasn’t there. Got tea with them and left about 5 o’clock, after speaking on the telephone to Ernie. Walked back by La Clytte and called in to Y M C A. Got back about 8 and wrote to Charlie but didn’t get letter finished. Warned for working party in the morning.

Sunderland Daily Echo 2 November 1917

MILITARY MEDAL

Newspaper Cutting
Image © Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.
Newspaper image and text sourced from The British Newspaper Archive.

Mrs E. W. Linfoot1, of 16, Nelson Street, has received a letter from her husband, Bomb. Linfoot, R.G.A., intimating that he has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery and devotion to duty on October 4th. Bomb Linfoot was an assistant with Messrs Hills and Co., stationers, Fawcett Street, prior to joining the Colours in May, 1916, and has been six months in France.


  1. “Mrs E. W. Linfoot” refers, of course, to Hilda Linfoot (née Tulip), wife of Mr E. W. Linfoot, ALL’s brother Ernie. See also Family page, and Hilda. 

13 October 1917; Saturday

Up about 7.30. Decided to go to meet Ernie but he came to see me with a friend. Harvey joined us and we walked into Locre and back by La Clytte1. He told me that he had been recommended for a Military Medal2. Had good time together. Had tea in Locre.


  1. The map shows this journey, from Kemmel (A) to Locre (B) and back via La Clytte (C). 

  2. Although not recorded in the diary, Ernie had been awarded the Military Medal on 4th October for repairing communication wiring at night in No Man’s Land. The staff officer who saw Ernie doing it recommended him for the award because – perhaps with limited experience of front-line realities – he assumed it must be an exceptional act of bravery; an assumption about which Ernie remained indignant for the rest of his life. Courageous it clearly was (however modest Ernie may have been about it), but it was routine rather than exceptional. See further narrative about Ernie and the R.G.A. in the footnote on 12 May 1916, all posts tagged “Ernie” and the Family page. 

24 September 1917; Monday

Up about 7 o’clock. On fatigue for a short while and then told off to go with the American doctor to see the Divisional column sick. Ernie called for me at noon and I got the afternoon off. Went into Locre. Called at the Y M and had tea and a tune; had tea in a house and then walked in to Mont Rouge. Called in at the Follies and started back shortly after 7 o’clock. Left Ernie about 8.30 near to La Laiterie1. The longest stay yet that we have had together. Enjoyed the day immensely. On return found that Driver had come down with shell shock, and that Holman had taken his place. They had wanted me but I was out. Nick Stake† sleeping above me and drunk. He fell out of bed and spent the night on a stretcher on the floor.


  1. La Laiterie: A military cemetery begun in November 1914 and named after an old dairy farm which, perhaps, had previously occupied the site. La Laiterie (B) is located about 1km NE of Kemmel (A) on the N331 road to Ieper/Ypres. 

7 September 1917; Friday

Up shortly after 7 o’clock. Parades as usual. Got inspected at 2 o’clock. Digging trench round a tent all morning. Went to Reninghelst at night and saw Ernie. We walked into the village and went to the Snipers1. They were very poor. Left shortly before 8 o’clock and returned about 9. Met a sergeant on the way who spoke of a very big attack * on the coast.


  1. The Snipers: Another revue?