Tag Archives: Charlie

Charlie was Arthur Linfoot’s younger brother. See the Family page for more details.

10 January 1918; Thursday

On guard at 2 o’clock. Called the others up at 7. Chopped wood first thing. On again from 10 – 12 and from 4 – 6. Fritz1 sent over a few whizzbangs2 at night about tea time. Off guard at 6 o’clock. Went to bed soon and slept well.

Dreamed that I was going to marry Mildred Whittaker3. Received long letter from Charlie.


  1. Fritz: a name given to German troops by the British and others in the First and Second World Wars. 

  2. Whizzbangs: high-velocity, low-trajectory shells giving only brief audible warning of approach. 

  3. Mildred Whittaker: Not otherwise mentioned in the diaries; possibly a relative of Willie Whittaker

25 December 1917; Tuesday

Up at about 7.30 after rather restless night with the cold. Paraded at 9 o’clock and did a small fatigue job. Cleaned canteen and wrote up diary. Two dining sessions and I went into the second one at 1.15. Very good spread. Menu and all the rest of it. C O and officers came in and made usual speech. Room very nicely decorated. Concert at 3.30. Steve Bott and John Dory pretty good and the others pretty awful. Corporal Chapman and Cotter about the worst singers. Went to A section billet to hear the R F’s1 band. Returned about 9 o’clock and went to bed.

Received letter from home saying that they had heard from Charlie dated 18th November.


  1. R F’s: probably Royal Fusiliers 

15 December 1917; Saturday

Took over at midnight. Did some French and wrote a short letter to Charlie. Didn’t sleep well all day. Warned for a new arrangement and to start at 8 tomorrow night instead of 4 o’clock to-night. Lay in bed. A few minutes later warned for duty at once and had to get up. No sooner on duty than warned to clear up and go back to bed and return to headquarters first thing in the morning. Returned to bed.

21 November 1917; Wednesday

Up at 7 o’clock. On parade in the morning. Wet day. I played the part of wounded man and was carried on a stretcher for the first time in my life. Football match in the afternoon between our team and the King’s Own1, first round in the cup tie – and we won 6 – 0. Received papers from home and “Everyman”2 published my letter in reply to Roderick Random. Received letter from Charlie written on the 28th October.


  1. The 7th battalion of the King’s Own Regiment was in the 56th Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. 

  2. The text of ALL’s published letter is reproduced here. See all diary entries tagged “Everyman” and also Everyman from the Arthur Linfoot’s library page. 

3 November 1917; Saturday

Up about 7 o’clock. On fatigue all day [“morning” written above, but “day” not erased]. Got pass to go and see Ernie in the afternoon. Walked to Dikbush and when I found the place he wasn’t there. Got tea with them and left about 5 o’clock, after speaking on the telephone to Ernie. Walked back by La Clytte and called in to Y M C A. Got back about 8 and wrote to Charlie but didn’t get letter finished. Warned for working party in the morning.

20 August 1917; Monday

Up at 7 o’clock. Paraded at 9 with our pals and went off to the Divisional sport. Went on the main road to Boulogne to a village called Lumbrubert1 and in a field near the sports were held. Everything laid out nicely. The medicals won the relay race and the * race and we were second in the high jump and the tug of war. Some very good sport. The Chesters top by one point, 26 and the medicals next 25. Fine day. Divisional band in attendance. Left about 7 o’clock and got back about 9. Walked most of the way there and rode most of the way back. Knocked about with Ben Jenkins and Billy Truman and that lot. Received letter from home telling me that Charlie had a gathered thumb and had burned his foot.

Divisional sports.


  1. Lumbrubert: not identified on the Michelin map; there is a Brunembert (B) just S. of the N42 Boulogne road, 11km W. of Nielles-les-Bléquin (A), so within walking distance; Michelin map square D3. 

17 August 1917; Friday

Up at 7 o’clock. Glorious day. Squad drill first thing, then kit inspection by new officer. Went down to the lower part of the stream but the water was too shallow for swimming. After dinner bath parade and a clean change by the stream at the old place. Went to the Follies at night with John Dory. They were very good and much better than before. Received letter from Charlie and one from home and wrote long letter home.

29 June 1917; Friday

Up at 7 o’clock. One bomb dropped in the night. Not far away. Off in the afternoon. Received letter from Charlie. Called at photo shop, but they weren’t ready. Received new patient, a captain of the 19th Division. Grand day. Learned some French at night. Billy Powell’s leave came through.