Category Archives: April 1918

All diary entries written in April 1918.

25 April 1918; Thursday

Up about 7 o’clock. Busy in hospital all day. Received orders in the afternoon to pack up and stand by. Many rumours in from the line.

Heard of attack on Zeebrugge1.


  1. The Zeebrugge raid, with the simultaneous smaller raid on Ostend, took place on 23/24 April and was intended to prevent German access into the North Sea for blockade and military/naval purposes. It was approved in February 1918, but originally suggested by Admiral Fisher in 1917, partly as an attempt to outflank the Western Front (allegedly related to the Passchendaele campaign.) The Zeebrugge element was largely ineffective, mainly due to failure of the smoke screen and consequent failure of the main warship to get to the right place and silence the shore batteries, with the result that the concrete-laden blockships did not get into the harbour. The Ostend attack failed totally, as the British warships did not even reach the harbour entrance. Nevertheless, the raid was presented to the British public as a great achievement and 8 Victoria Crosses were awarded. 

21 April 1918; Sunday

Reveille at 3.30. Marched off about 6 o’clock. Arrived at Proven 1 at about 10 o’clock. Had something to eat and then started work. Got small dressing room nearly ready when we had to take over D R S 2 and †fit up† by the big house. Very nice place. Worked pretty hard. Went into the village at night and were at the end of a church service. The parson very dry. Had good night’s sleep.


  1. Proven (B) about 7km NW of Poperinghe (A). 

  2. “D R S”: Divisional Rest Station; see The Chain of Evacuation of The Royal Army Medical Corps at RAMC in the Great War. 

17 April 1918; Wednesday

Up about 7 o’clock. Did practically nothing all day. A tremendous lot of French troops about. Heard that we are holding our own. The Germans shelled Westouter† in the morning and our people had shelled †out of† the convent. Some civilians killed and wounded. A very hot time for the people in the town. Some of our bearers went up again at night.

16 April 1918; Tuesday

Up at 7 o’clock. Moved off to a C C S 1 place behind Poperinghe2 about 10 and arrived at dinnertime. Rested all day and slept well at night. Very heavy fighting all day. Beare†, Nelson, Watson and Gray came down gassed slightly. Heard that Sergeant Watson had been killed within 12 hours of joining us.


  1. CCS: Casualty Clearing Station. 

  2. Poperinge (B), about 5km NNW of Reninghelst (A).