Tag Archives: Map

Diary entries which illustrate the locations of the events recorded using maps. See also Maps.

10 May 1917; Thursday

Up at 5.30. Turned in after a bath and slept until about 1 o’clock. Up pretty early but had no dinner. Ordered at 3.50 to be ready at 4.15 to go to Baileul. Got out there and marched off with the party. Captain Jackson and a few men came down from Ypres to the town track† shortly before we got there. Fell out at Meteren 1 and waited about half an hour for Sergeant Holmes. Had short walk round the town at night and got down to bed pretty late. Very warm day.


  1. The map shows the entire journey, from Mont des Cats (A), via Méteren (B), where ALL fell out during the journey, and back to Bailleul (C). 

7 May 1917; Monday

Up at 5.30. Took temperatures and emptied bucket as usual. Turned into bed about 9 o’clock and slept until 2 o’clock. Walked into the village of Berthen1 after tea. Read a bit in the afternoon and went on duty at night. Shaved† two officers – one deaf and had killed† a lot of Germans. Busy until after midnight. Went to sleep at 2 o’clock and woke at 5 o’clock.


  1. Berthen (B): 2km E of Mont des Chats (A) and midway between Poperinghe (to the North) and Bailleul (to the South), rather to the W. of both; Michelin square I3. 

6 May 1917; Sunday

Up at 5.30. Kept busy until 7 o’clock. Finished at 7.30 and had breakfast. Went into bed but slept badly. Up at 2 o’clock and washed. Did a bit French in the afternoon. Glanced at the British Weekly. At the evening C of E service in the dinner hour. News that the British have lost Bullecourt1, but the French have advanced a bit and captured some prisoners.


  1. Bullecourt is in the triangle Arras-Cambrai-Bapaume, 4km E. of the A1/E15 road; Michelin square J6. 

2 May 1917; Wednesday

Postcard of the Abbey at Mont des Cats
Postcard of the Abbey at Mont des Cats (see footnote)

Up at 6 o’clock. Got ready for the march. Fine morning. Arrived at Mont des Cats12 at about 1 o’clock. Very hot on the march and the heavy bank at the end nearly did us all in. A splendid place. An old priory or something of the sort with monks in it. A very large place. Watched view from the top. Had dinner and then went to our billets upstairs. On night duty. Went on at 7.30. Old Sergeant Wilson incensed†. Didn’t get down to bed at all. Took officer’s temperature. Sat in easy chairs to sleep.


  1. Mont des Cats (B): 12km W. of La Clytte/Klijte (A), Michelin squares H3/I3. 

  2. ALL brought home a postcard (image above) from his 1935 tour of his battlefields showing the Abbey at Mont des Cats, with a note that he had lived there for a week. Interestingly, the name “Mont des Cats” had been neatly excised from the card, presumably during WW1 for security reasons – but the card must still have been in the shop’s stock in 1935. 

1 May 1917; Tuesday

Up at 6.30. Packed all up and ready to move. Left about 10 o’clock and marched to Le Clyte [sic]1. I had a touch of diarrhoea and fell out at Locre and visited a latrine there. Followed them up and arrived shortly after 6. Spent afternoon cleaning up equipment. Had a dose of castor oil. Went over Mont Rouge2 at night with Harvey and Holman. Splendid night and I enjoyed the walk. Sat on the hill and looked round a bit. Returned via West Outer [sic] 3. Went to bed about 9 o’clock.


  1. “Le Clyte”: The march was from Bailleul (A) to La Clytte (now Klijte; B). La Clytte is about 10km NE of Bailleul. 

  2. Mont Rouge (C): Now known as Rodeberg, a peak 143m high about 1.5km W. of Locre/Loker. 

  3. West Outer (if correct): Westouter (D), 4km W. of La Clytte/Klijte, Michelin square I3. 

28 April 1917; Saturday

Up at 8 o’clock. Helped to rig up dispensary during the morning. Did a bit French at dinner time. Walked into Méteren1 at night and called at Jeanne’s†2. Bought an apron for Gertie. Stayed a good while and talked. A young New Zealander there. Returned about 8 o’clock.


  1. Méteren (B); 3km W of Bailleul (A). 

  2. Jeanne’s: Possibly the same “Jeanes” or “Jennis” mentioned on 20 March. A café? 

26 April 1917; Thursday

Up shortly after 7 o’clock. Paraded at 9. Cleaning waggons until 12 o’clock. Sergeant-major ordered me over Baileul [sic] after dinner1. Gave me five minutes’ notice. Rode down in car with Bromley. A splendid place. Washed and cleaned up in the afternoon and then went to the concert. A very good concert. Good orchestra. First half turns and second half “dramatic fragment.” Looked up news at night, which spoke of heavy fighting. Went to bed late.

Will have to play my cards very carefully. Finished reading Villette2.


  1. “Baileul”: Actually Bailleul (B), 10km SSW of La Clyttte/Klijte (A). As usual “after dinner” means “after lunch”; the move to Bailleul would have been in the afternoon, not the evening. 

  2. Villette: Novel by Charlotte Brontë first mentioned by ALL on 9th April. See also Arthur Linfoot’s Library

23 April 1917; Monday

Up at 7 o’clock. At the hospital on duty. Cleaned things pretty well up. Finished at night at 6.30 and were relieved by A section. Had short walk out at night.

Went into Kemmel 1 and returned by Locre 2 with Sergeant Powell, Holman and Harvey. Passed a 6” battery firing over our heads.


  1. Kemmel (B): 3km SE. of La Clytte/Klijte (A); Michelin square I3

  2. Locre/Loker (C) is 3km SW of La Clyttte/Klijte. 

27 March 1917; Tuesday

Up at 7 o’clock. Kept fairly busy. Got a few letters written. Walked into Westouter1 at night and had some coffee at Alice’s. They have had their business stopped by the gendarme, and served us on the quiet. Saw * places *.


  1. Westouter (B): 4km W. of La Clytte/Klijte (A), Michelin square I3. 

26 March 1917; Monday

Up at 7 o’clock and on duty as usual. Had to look after a sick officer most of the morning. Went to Renninghelst1 at night to the Crumps concert2. It was very good – the best I have seen in France. Went in the motor ambulance and walked back up.


  1. Renninghelst (sic): Actually Reninghelst, now Flemish Reningelst (B), 6km NW. of La Clytte/Klijte (A), towards Poperinghe; Michelin square I3. 

  2. “Crumps concert”; presumably another soldiers’ revue. Crump is an old English dialect word for a hard hit or blow which, after 1914, came to be used for the explosion of a heavy artillery shell; the craters left by such shells were often referred to as crump-holes. This may be how The Crumps concert party got its name.