Tag Archives: Ernie

Ernie was Arthur Linfoot’s elder brother. See also the Family page.

3 January 1918; Thursday

Up about 7.45. On parade at 9 o’clock. On working party in the wood. Some German planes over and dropped bombs. Killed a few men and several horses. One of the planes brought down with a bomb. Wrote letter to Ernie. Fine bright day.

Sergeant Rogers warned me to go to the walking wounded place to relieve Mills at once. Went on the car immediately after dinner. Helped with some field artillery wounded. Went to bed about 9.30.

10 December 1917; Monday

Up about 8 o’clock. No rations up so we had iron ration biscuits and bully for breakfast with a drink of tea without any sugar. Paraded at 10. I reported sick and was given duty. The American officer put a bandage on my ankle. Spent afternoon writing a letter home. We tried to improve our billet but the sergeants took it from us because two officers took theirs. Received letters from Gertie, Mother, Ernie and Hilda Linfoot1 in New Zealand. Got down to it about 8 o’clock. Had a look inside of a tank. Walked round inside gate† and was very much interested in it. Quite a lot2 where we are. A rumour that some of us are going to a place on duty.


  1. Hilda Tate Linfoot, ALL’s cousin. See Hilda disambiguation page

  2. “Quite a lot [of tanks]”: By this stage of the war in late 1917, tanks were deployed in large numbers – see also note on 22 November

8 November 1917; Thursday

Up about 7 o’clock. On parade at 9 o’clock. Helped to pack in the morning. Got pass to Bailleul in the afternoon but Ernie didn’t turn up there so I only went into Locre. Returned in good time.

Heard of the death of Willie Whittaker 1 in a letter from Ernie.


  1. ALL also recorded this in a note added to his diary on the date of Willie Whittaker’s death, 22 October 1917

4 November 1917; Sunday

Military Medal
Ernie Linfoot’s military medal. Image courtesy of Patricia Munn. Click or tap to enlarge.

Up at 7 o’clock. Went up on the car to spoil bank on working party and stayed until about 3 o’clock. Rode down on two lorries. Ernie waiting for me. Harry Bascombe looked after him and got him tea. Ernie stayed to the beginning of the Y M service. He was wearing the Military Medal. I set him up the way back to the brasserie, and we talked all about my leave and all the rest of it.

Saw Ernie first thing after leave and he was wearing the Military Medal.

3 November 1917; Saturday

Up about 7 o’clock. On fatigue all day [“morning” written above, but “day” not erased]. Got pass to go and see Ernie in the afternoon. Walked to Dikbush and when I found the place he wasn’t there. Got tea with them and left about 5 o’clock, after speaking on the telephone to Ernie. Walked back by La Clytte and called in to Y M C A. Got back about 8 and wrote to Charlie but didn’t get letter finished. Warned for working party in the morning.

Sunderland Daily Echo 2 November 1917

MILITARY MEDAL

Newspaper Cutting
Image © Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.
Newspaper image and text sourced from The British Newspaper Archive.

Mrs E. W. Linfoot1, of 16, Nelson Street, has received a letter from her husband, Bomb. Linfoot, R.G.A., intimating that he has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery and devotion to duty on October 4th. Bomb Linfoot was an assistant with Messrs Hills and Co., stationers, Fawcett Street, prior to joining the Colours in May, 1916, and has been six months in France.


  1. “Mrs E. W. Linfoot” refers, of course, to Hilda Linfoot (née Tulip), wife of Mr E. W. Linfoot, ALL’s brother Ernie. See also Family page, and Hilda.